PACHSmörgåsbord

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Distilling Ancient Greek Alchemy from the Manuscripts

Matteo Martelli’s recent Brown Bag Lecture at CHF offered a nice diversion from the more modern presentations. His project, to recover the contours of ancient Greek alchemy, raise some historigraphic issues.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 04/28 at 10:01 PM

Sunday, April 25, 2010

The Weekly Smörgåsbord #8

Back to a regular schedule for the Weekly Smörgåsbord, with links to posts ranging from witchcraft to SETI.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 04/25 at 10:57 PM

Saturday, April 24, 2010

Barnes, Berkowitz, and British Medicine at the Wagner

David Barnes offered the commentary on Carin Berkowitz’s paper about rhetoric and British medical practice. A spirited if smallish audience showed up at the Wagner to participate.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 04/24 at 10:50 PM

Sunday, April 18, 2010

The Weekly Smörgåsbord #7

After a few weeks off, due to travels and grading, the Weekly Smörgåsbord returns with links to posts ranging from Regiomontanus to the RAND Corporation.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 04/18 at 12:01 AM

Monday, April 12, 2010

HoS Micropost: On-Line History of Medicine Museum

The Science Museum in London has recently launched a site devoted to the history of medicine. It’s one of the better history of medicine sites and well worth a visit, and some time.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 04/12 at 10:25 PM

Sunday, April 11, 2010

Science in the Renaissance (Society of America)

The RSA held it’s annual conference in Venice last week. It was successful on a number of levels, not the least of which was the number of history of science panels at the conference. With nearly 20 panels and other papers scattered across panels, most historians of science would have found something interesting to hear.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 04/11 at 09:05 AM

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  • The views and opinions expressed on this blog are strictly those of their respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the Philadelphia Area Center for History of Science.

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