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Thursday, August 26, 2010

The Name’s Wilkins. Maurice Wilkins.

The English physicist and crystallographer Maurice Wilkins was under investigation by MI5 during the period when Watson & Crick were working on the structure of DNA. This suggests a role for Wilkins in Watson's brilliant farce/memoir, The Double Helix.

Posted by Nathaniel Comfort on 08/26 at 08:17 AM

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Reconstructing the History of Science, in LEGOs

Andrew Carol reconstruct historical scientific instruments using LEGOs. Amusing in a nerdy sort of way.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 08/10 at 10:46 PM

Wednesday, August 04, 2010

Ernst Haeckel’s Letter to E.D. Cope

A letter from Ernst Haeckel to Edward D. Cope, asking Cope to forward additional books on to other recipients.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 08/04 at 10:51 PM

Tuesday, August 03, 2010

Surveying “The Giant’s Shoulders”

A history of the history of science blog carnival, or rather, a survey. Like more traditional publication venues, historians of science don’t seem terribly active in producing on-line content.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 08/03 at 10:33 PM

Monday, August 02, 2010

Exploring Collections: Early American Imprints at the Library Company

A quick look at a couple rare early American scientific imprints from the Zinman Collection at The Library Company of Philadelphia.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 08/02 at 10:38 PM

Sunday, August 01, 2010

History of Science in Philadelphia—Curie’s Early Piezo-Electric Apparatus

One of Marie and Pierre Curie’s earliest piezo-electric apparatus sits quietly in the lobby at The College of Physicians of Philadelphia. It was used in their early research on the radioactivity of Radium.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 08/01 at 10:00 PM

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  • The views and opinions expressed on this blog are strictly those of their respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the Consortium for History of Science, Technology and Medicine.

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