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Friday, April 22, 2011

Why should we care…? IV. Toward a poetics of HSMT

In which we discuss the aesthetics of the history of science, medicine, and technology--and insist that “concretize” is not a word.

Posted by Nathaniel Comfort on 04/22 at 10:32 AM
(3) Comments

Friday, April 15, 2011

The Tramp, the Professor, and Frankenstein’s Brain Surgeon

An account of the meeting between Chaplin, Einstein, and Chaplin’s physician Dr. Cecil Reynolds(who was later to be a consultant for the film Frankenstein).

Posted in honor of what would have been Chaplin’s 122nd birthday.

Posted by Paul Halpern on 04/15 at 05:43 PM
(2) Comments

Monday, April 11, 2011

Why should we care…? III. Maybe we shouldn’t

The history of science matters. What counts as the History of Science doesn’t.

Posted by Nathaniel Comfort on 04/11 at 10:21 AM
(3) Comments

Friday, April 08, 2011

The Accidental Collection:  Ephemeral Publications from the Philadelphia Anti-Nuclear Movement

Several boxes of material that I collected while attending Temple University in the early 1980s are now housed at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst

Posted by Paul Halpern on 04/08 at 10:30 AM

Secundum Artem:  Selected Works of Art and Design from the University of the Sciences Collection

The Marvin Samson Center for the History of Pharmacy is housing a special exhibit about the artistic aspects of medical, scientific and pharmaceutical devices.  The exhibit will close on May 27.

Posted by Paul Halpern on 04/08 at 10:30 AM

Wednesday, April 06, 2011

Why should we care…? II. History as a way of knowing

Why should we care about the history of science? The argument from utility.

Posted by Nathaniel Comfort on 04/06 at 03:11 PM
(4) Comments

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  • The views and opinions expressed on this blog are strictly those of their respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the Philadelphia Area Center for History of Science.

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