PACHSmörgåsbord

Friday, March 30, 2012

R. G. Collingwood on Historical Practice

In my efforts to think more about what makes history and history of science distinct, I reread R. G. Collingwood’s The Idea of History. I appreciate that it is old and perhaps out of fashion, but I think it offers some useful suggestions about historical practice.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 03/30 at 10:24 AM
(1) Comments

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Columbus’s Voyage was a Religious Journey

This post looks briefly at both Columbus’s motivations for sailing westward and his opinions about the size of the earth. In both we see not a forward thinking secularist but a conservative thinker motivated by religion and apocalyptic fears. Obama got it wrong

Posted by Darin Hayton on 03/27 at 02:33 PM

Monday, March 26, 2012

Why the Flat Earth Myth Bugs Me

The fact that the flat earth myth persists is evidence that historians of science are failing to engage the public. We need to do a better job communicating with the public.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 03/26 at 02:37 PM

Monday, March 19, 2012

HOS Micropost: Collect it, Display it, and Call it a Museum

When does a personal collection become a museum? A recent NY Times article seems to present that question.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 03/19 at 11:02 PM

Thursday, March 15, 2012

President Obama Invokes Flat Earth Myth

President Obama gets the history of science wrong, horribly wrong.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 03/15 at 09:32 PM

Tuesday, March 06, 2012

Scientists and Bad History

More thoughts on historical problems in the recent article by F. Domínguez-Castro et al., “How Useful Could Arabic Documentary Sources Be For Reconstructing Past Climate?”

Posted by Darin Hayton on 03/06 at 02:02 PM

Page 1 of 1

Subscribe to the PACHS RSS feed.

In the Blogs

Contributor Login

Recent Entries

Current Contributors

Categories

Recent Tags

Disclaimer

  • The views and opinions expressed on this blog are strictly those of their respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the Philadelphia Area Center for History of Science.

Archives