PACHSmörgåsbord

Monday, February 16, 2009

The Human-Environment Working Group

Posted by Babak Ashrafi on 02/16 at 02:20 PM

Gwen Ottinger writes in about a local working group that she helps to organize:

Members of the PACHS community whose work touches on environmental issues in any period will want to note another interdisciplinary network of scholars forming in the Philadelphia area.  The Human-Environment Working Group (HEWG, pronounced “huge”) was established in October 2008 to bring together academic researchers interested in the human dimensions of environmental pollution, conservation, and change.  Drawing from universities and non-profits in Philadelphia and its suburbs, the network includes historians, anthropologists, sociologists, and geographers, among others.  HEWG gatherings, which occur monthly, feature an environmentally themed program, followed by social time at a local restaurant or pub.  Past programs have included a lecture by noted scientist and writer Sandra Steingraber on “The Many Faces of DDT” (part of the Chemical Heritage Foundation’s Molecules that Matter series) and a tour of Friends Center newly “greened” in its recent renovations. 

HEWG will gather next on Tuesday, February 17, at J. Timmons Roberts’s talk, “Global Climate Justice: Winners and Losers in a Warming World,” part of the Drexel Global Warming Speaker Series.  The talk starts at 3:30 in the Mitchell Auditorium, Bossone Research Enterprise Center, 32nd and Market Streets.  On March 18, HEWG will tour the Cobbs Creek Community Environmental Education Center. 

For more information about HEWG or to receive e-mail announcements about HEWG activities, contact Gwen Ottinger – gottinger (at) chemheritage (dot) org.

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