Nathaniel Comfort

Assoc. Prof., Dept. of History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

Baltimore, MD

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Biomedicine, 20th century, genetics, eugenics, evolution, popularization of science, oral history

Also blogs at: http://genotopia.scienceblog.com

Nathaniel Comfort is the author of The Tangled Field: Barbara McClintock’s Search for the Patterns of Genetic Control (Harvard, 2001) and editor of The Panda’s Black Box: Opening Up the Intelligent Design Controversy (Johns Hopkins, 2007). His essays have appeared in The New York Times Book Review, Science, American Scientist, National Public Radio, Natural History, The Believer, and the Utne Reader. His current book, a history American medical genetics, will be published as soon as possible with Yale University Press.

Blog Posts

Putting the person in personalized medicine

July 25, 2011

Why should we care…? IV. Toward a poetics of HSMT

April 22, 2011

Why should we care…? III. Maybe we shouldn’t

April 11, 2011

Why should we care…? II. History as a way of knowing

April 06, 2011

Who cares about the history of science?

March 24, 2011

The supernormal and the pathological

February 28, 2011

Euphenics, Algeny, and Orthobiosis

February 23, 2011

Rock star genetics: the 27GP

December 16, 2010

Charles Babbage, Eat Your Heart Out

December 10, 2010

The Panopticon Inverted

November 30, 2010

“His chromosomes made him do it” — again

November 19, 2010

Sequence just wants to be free

November 01, 2010

What are the lessons of the recent history of biomedicine?

October 13, 2010

Philadelphia story

September 28, 2010

Medicalizing Violence

September 17, 2010

Personal genomics: “measures of intelligence”

September 09, 2010

The Name’s Wilkins. Maurice Wilkins.

August 26, 2010

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  • The views and opinions expressed on this blog are strictly those of their respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the Philadelphia Area Center for History of Science.

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