PACHSmörgåsbord: Historiography

Thursday, December 17, 2009

A literature review of Pluto

This post is the first in series of posts on Pluto, formerly known as a planet. I offer some background to why I am interested in Pluto and provide a sketch of the form this series of posts will take. I do not offer any opinion about the status of Pluto, at least not here.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 12/17 at 10:15 PM
(2) Comments

Friday, December 18, 2009

A review of David A. Weintraub’s Is Pluto a Planet?

This is the first review of the literature on Pluto. Here I look at David Weintraub’s Is Pluto a Planet? Weintraub supports Pluto’s planetary status and is, probably, still upset that the IAU’s definition of a planet excludes Pluto.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 12/18 at 01:25 AM
(1) Comments

Sunday, December 20, 2009

Govert Shilling: Pluto is Icy Chunk of Space Debris

Govert Shilling’s The Hunt for Planet X is the second review in my survey of the literature on Pluto. Unlike Weintraub, Shilling does not think Pluto deserves the status of planet. It seems that for Shilling, the IAU’s decision in 2006 was long overdue.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 12/20 at 10:49 PM
(1) Comments

Tuesday, March 02, 2010

Can Business History Inform History of Science?

Daniele Cozzoli offered a detailed chronology of the development of antihistamines from the early 1930s through the mid- to late-1940s. He arranged these developments broadly against the backdrop of World War II and French-German business interests,on the one hand, and French-U.S. on the other.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 03/02 at 10:30 PM

Sunday, March 21, 2010

The Weekly Smörgåsbord #5

A short Smörgåsbord of posts and articles from last week.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 03/21 at 08:51 AM

Sunday, March 28, 2010

The Weekly Smörgåsbord #6

This week’s roundup of posts includes a few good articles too. There were a number of good Ada Lovelace posts around, but rather than link to them all, I chose a couple that I liked and pointed to the Ada Lovelace site, which collected most of them.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 03/28 at 12:00 PM

Tuesday, March 30, 2010

The Scientific Revolution: China’s Failure (pt. 1)?

This is the first is of perhaps three or four posts that explores the history and historiography of the Scientific Revolution. In particular, these posts will examine some of the explanations historians have given for why the Scientific Revolution occurred in Western Europe and not elsewhere, most notably China or Islam.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 03/30 at 06:00 AM

Sunday, April 18, 2010

The Weekly Smörgåsbord #7

After a few weeks off, due to travels and grading, the Weekly Smörgåsbord returns with links to posts ranging from Regiomontanus to the RAND Corporation.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 04/18 at 12:01 AM

Thursday, June 03, 2010

Renaissance Art or Neuroanatomy (part 1)?

The first rant about physicians and scientists dabbling in the history of science. The example this time is an article by F. L. Meshberger on Michelangelo’s Creation of Adam fresco in the Sistine Chapel.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 06/03 at 10:00 PM
(1) Comments

Thursday, June 10, 2010

Renaissance Art or Neuroanatomy (part 2)?

Another rant about physicians and scientists dabbling in the history of science. Seems often to produce a naive whig history. This rant focuses on Suk and Tamargo’s “Concealed Neuroanatomy in Michelangelo’s Separation of Light From Darkness in the Sistine Chapel,” which just appeared in Neurosurgery.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 06/10 at 10:36 PM

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  • The views and opinions expressed on this blog are strictly those of their respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the Consortium for History of Science, Technology and Medicine.

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