PACHSmörgåsbord: Witchcraft

Sunday, April 25, 2010

The Weekly Smörgåsbord #8

Back to a regular schedule for the Weekly Smörgåsbord, with links to posts ranging from witchcraft to SETI.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 04/25 at 10:57 PM

Thursday, December 23, 2010

The Role of Experts in Identifying Witchcraft

A (belated) summary of Jonathan Seitz’s recent colloquium, along with an account of the discussion that followed. Jonathan’s colloquium confronted a number of historiographical issues about expertise and experts. It also showed that early modern talks can draw reasonable crowds.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 12/23 at 10:53 PM
(1) Comments

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Really? Demonology was a Science?

At the recent Science on Tap Jonathan Seitz prompted people to think more broadly about what constitutes a science, both in the past and the present. Demonology, he argued, was a science that tried to categorize and make sense of natural phenomena.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 10/11 at 09:52 AM

Thursday, October 27, 2011

How Many Witches Were Executed?!?

Jess Blumberg commits a significant error in a new article on the Salem Witch Trials. Once again a journalist with the support and authority of some magazine makes unsubstantiated and indefensible claims about the witch trials. This post takes Blumberg to task.
UPDATE: The editors at Smithsonian.com have corrected Blumberg’s original article.

Posted by Darin Hayton on 10/27 at 03:50 PM

Monday, January 07, 2013

What can Witchcraft Confessions Teach Us?

A recent article in the BBC about Japanese preference for confessions in criminal trials seems oddly familiar. Confessions for witchcraft can raise some interesting questions about confessions and our continued reliance on them

Posted by Darin Hayton on 01/07 at 01:32 PM

Page 1 of 1

Subscribe to the Consortium RSS feed.

In the Blogs

Contributor Login

Recent Entries

Categories

Recent Tags

Disclaimer

  • The views and opinions expressed on this blog are strictly those of their respective authors and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the Consortium for History of Science, Technology and Medicine.

Archives